Royal Botanic Gardens Kew

For the last two weeks of my 4 months in UK I was fortunate enough to go and work at the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew. My experiences were quite varied and I got to work in a number of different areas of Kew detailed below.

My first day at Kew was spent helping one of the gardeners re-sand and dress the alpine stock beds.

My first day at Kew was spent helping one of the gardeners re-sand and dress the alpine stock beds, ready to sink the pots back in at a later date.

On only our second day at Kew it was all hands on deck as all different departments joined forces to dig out some 500,000 bulbs from the broadwalk.  The plan is to turn these borders into one of the ;largest herbaceous displays in the country.

IMG_20141209_083817

Most of my remaining time at Kew was spent working in the arboretum section, it just so happened I joined the team in the arboretum section just as they were starting a large re-generation and clearing project.  The Camellia walk, was cleared of all ivy, leaves and then the bed was forked over to get rid of couch grass ready for re-planting.

 We started off by clearing away all the leaves and unwanted ivy


We started off by clearing away all the leaves and unwanted ivy

Of all of the gardens I have worked in so far, Kew is one of the first that use tarpaulins to get rid of vast quantities of waste.

Of all of the gardens I have worked in so far, Kew is one of the first that use tarpaulins to get rid of vast quantities of waste.

This was another first for me, Kew had its own skip delivery tractor for large quantities of waste. (Of which there was plenty)

This was another first for me, Kew had its own skip delivery tractor for large quantities of waste.
(Of which there was plenty)

This is how the Camellia walk looked when we had finished clearing and forking over.

For my last two days at Kew I was lucky enough to join the arborist team (The Tree Gang).  Their main aim while I was working with them was to cut dead wood from trees in the camellia walk, while taking out any unsightly branches while they were up in there.

With around 14,000 trees to look after spread over 300 acres. The tree gang need a trusty steed to get them around.

With around 14,000 trees to look after spread over 300 acres. The tree gang need a trusty steed to get them around.

Once the unwanted branches were cut out of the trees, the grounds team got to work putting them through this beast of a machine below, self contained and easily towable behind their tractor, provides an ideal solution to the massive amounts of brash that need getting rid of.


 

 

 

 

 

 

A pest that has troubled the arboretum team at Kew in recent years is OPM (Oak processionary moth) thought to be more harmful to humans that come into contact with it than to the oak tree it nests in.

My last afternoon was spent doing a job I quite enjoy, cleaning down and making sure all the chainsaws, were nice a clean ready to start the new week.

2 comments

  1. Sarah M

    Great to hear about your time at Kew, on a scale so different to Hidcote. You’ve already spent your first week in Japan – can’t wait to hear how you’re getting on. I’d be really interested to see any specialist tools you use which we don’t have in the UK and whether you think they’re worth trying to get hold of.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: